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Health and Nutrition

Benefits of Physical Activity.
Physical activity is an important step you can take to improve your health and quality of life. Regular physical activity may help prevent or delay many health problems. Being active may help you look and feel better, both now and in the future. This information may help you identify and beat your roadblocks to physical activity! Learn tips to create a plan to get moving or add more activity to your life.

Using the World Around You to Stay Healthy and Fit.
No matter who you are or where you live, eating well and getting regular exercise are important ways to be healthy. These activities may help you maintain a healthy weight and prevent or delay certain health problems, such as diabetes. Cities and suburbs usually offer large grocery stores and gyms. These facilities may make it easier to live healthfully.

Changing Your Habits for Better Health.
Are you thinking about being more active? Have you been trying to cut back on less healthy foods? Are you starting to eat better and move more but having a hard time sticking with these changes? Old habits die hard. Changing your habits is a process that involves several stages. Sometimes it takes a while before changes become new habits. And, you may face roadblocks along the way.

Some Myths about Nutrition & Physical Activity.
Are you overwhelmed by daily decisions about what to eat, how much to eat, when to eat, and how much physical activity you need to be healthy? If so, don’t be discouraged because you’re not alone. With so many choices and decisions, it can be hard to know what to do and which information you can trust.

How diet can affect mental health: the link between diet and the brain.
What people choose to eat doesn’t just affect their waistlines, but maybe also the way they think and feel, according to a growing body of research. Some Americans may believe that eating “comfort foods” leads to happiness.

Seafood – the food for thought.
(StatePoint) We hear a lot about the important nutrients in vegetables and fruits, but the health benefits of eating seafood regularly aren’t always in the spotlight. Here are some evidence-based facts to help set the record straight during National Nutrition Month. 1. How much seafood should I be eating?

Dental health important in advanced years of life.
We know that as people get older, their bodies change. For instance, eyesight and hearing may not be as sharp in your 60s as they were in your 20s. Your skin and hair can also reveal the visible signs of aging. Aging also has an effect on your oral hygiene. Though aging is a part of life, it doesn’t have to mean sacrificing good health.

8 ways to naturally relieve stress.
How often do you think you feel stressed? A recent study of 2,000 Brits, by health tracking service Forth with Life, found we spend an average nine solid days each month battling stress. Whether it’s the 500 unread emails in your work inbox, a stack of unpaid bills waiting on your doormat, or demanding family duties draining your energy, it can often feel like the cycle of mental strain is never-ending.

Lifestyle affects your heart health.
Are you overwhelmed by daily decisions about what to eat, how much to eat, when to eat, and how much physical activity you need to be healthy? If so, don’t be discouraged because you’re not alone. With so many choices and decisions, it can be hard to know what to do and which information you can trust.

6 tips to keep seasonal allergies from running your life.
Spring in Utah is an exciting time, with warmer temperatures and plants coming alive everywhere you look. Unfortunately, for many people the excitement soon turns to misery as they begin sneezing, rubbing their itchy eyes and wiping their runny noses all day. If this sounds like you, you’re not alone. Nearly 30 percent of adults and 40 percent of children have seasonal allergies.

Restoring your heart’s youthfulness.
Exercising in middle age reverses impact of a sedentary lifestyle, study shows. For middle-aged adults struggling with exercise after years of inactivity, three new studies might rekindle their motivation. All conclude that mid-life (and older) adults can sustain an exercise routine and gain a range of health benefits. The most remarkable of the papers, “Reversing the Cardiac Effects of Sedentary Ageing in Middle Age” was published in Circulation, the journal of the American Heart Association.